Tag: Build

3 Ways to Build Business Credit

What are the Ways to Business Credit? 

Business credit is credit you get in the name of a business. It does not attach to the business owner’s SSN. It is not dependent on the entrepreneur’s ability to pay debts. But it does depend on whether the business can pay its bills. Better business credit means your business can get more funding when it needs it, at better rates and terms than if you don’t work to build your business credit. Here are 3 ways to build business credit.

Business Credit is Not Automatic

You have to actively work to build it. Did you know over 9 out of every 10 vendors do not report to the business credit reporting agencies, Dun & Bradstreet, Experian, and Equifax? Therefore, except for requesting a trade reference, those nonreporting vendors don’t help you build business credit. So, what do you do? The following actions will help you no matter which method you use to build your company’s business credit.

Check Out Ways to Build Business Credit

Improving business credit scores means paying your bills on time. It also means paying with credit rather than cash when you can. This increases the number of accounts and purchases on your reports. And use the credit you already have regularly, so those accounts are not eventually closed due to inactivity.

A business starts building a brand-new credit profile much the same as a consumer does. Both start with no credit profile. The business gets approval for new credit reporting to the business credit reporting agencies. The business uses the credit and pays the bill timely. This establishes a positive business credit profile. As the business continues using credit and pays bills timely it will qualify for more credit.

Check out our best webinar with its trustworthy list of seven vendors to help you build business credit.

The First of 3 Ways to Build Business Credit: Vendor Accounts

One of the three ways to build business credit is with starter vendor accounts. These are companies which will approve your business with little fuss. A vendor line of credit is when a company (vendor) extends a line of credit to your business on Net 15, 30, 60 or 90 day terms. Hence you can buy their products or services up to a maximum dollar amount. And you have 15, 30, 60 or 90 days to pay the bill in full.

Since vendor accounts generally don’t ultimately come from a bank, like major credit cards (Visa, etc.) do, you can try to apply without using your Social Security number. Always apply first without using your SSN. Some vendors will request it and some will even tell you on the phone they must have it. But try to submit first without it.

Starter Vendors and D&B

When your first Net 30 account reports your tradeline to Dun & Bradstreet, the D-U-N-S system will automatically activate your file if it isn’t active already. This is also true for Experian and Equifax. Applying without your SSN means the vendor won’t pull your personal credit. As a result, you will be building business credit and not personal credit!

You need at least 3 vendor accounts reporting to move on. It can take a billing cycle to get your payment to show up in D&B’s system. Some vendors may want you to prepay or may have a minimal order requirement before they reporting to a business CRA. They may have minimal FICO score requirements as well. But you can often get around a minimum FICO requirement by working with a guarantor with good personal credit.

One of the Ways to Build Business Credit is to Go Beyond Starter Vendor Accounts

As you continue to prove yourself and your business, it becomes possible to qualify for revolving store credit. You can also qualify for fleet credit to buy fuel or repair and maintain vehicles. And you can even qualify for more universal cash credit from Visa and MasterCard and the like. So don’t stop with starter vendor accounts!

Check out our best webinar with its trustworthy list of seven vendors to help you build business credit.

The Second of 3 Ways to Build Business Credit: Our Credit Line Hybrid

You can get a line of credit for up to $150,000. This is no doc financing. Pay 0% for up to 18 months. It helps build business credit because your payments are reported. You must have a 680 or better FICO score. For more information, surf on over to my.creditsuite.com/qualifier-form.

This program works to help clients get funding based strictly on personal credit quality. Our lenders will not ask for financials, bank statements, business plans, resumes, or any of the other burdensome document requests which most conventional lenders demand.

Our lenders will review your credit report to ensure there are no derogatory items on it. To get approval, you shouldn’t have any open collections, late payments, tax liens, judgments, or the like on your report.

To qualify you should also have fewer than 5 inquiries on your credit report, within the last 6 months. You should have established credit. This includes open revolving accounts now reported on your credit report, with balances below 40% of your limits.

The Third of 3 Ways to Build Business Credit: Using the D&B CreditBuilder

Dun & Bradstreet has their own credit builder. It can help you get better business credit, but only with D&B. Dun & Bradstreet is huge, so concentrating just on them could be an effective strategy.

D&B offers advice for building business credit. A lot of it should be familiar. Their seven steps are to establish your business as a separate entity, register for a D-U-N-S number, get an EIN from the IRS, open a bank account for your business, make on-time payments, ask vendors to supply trade references to Dun & Bradstreet, and monitor your business credit scores and ratings.

Check out our best webinar with its trustworthy list of seven vendors to help you build business credit.

D&B’s CreditBuilder ™ Plus

CreditBuilder Plus is essentially a monitoring service exclusive to Dun & Bradstreet. One major advantage is getting a D-U-N-S number faster than most businesses do. You can use it to get alerts when others request your business credit report. And you can get a D-U-N-S Number and business credit file in 5 business days or less. 

Plus you can get unlimited access to your D&B scores and ratings. And you can add 12 positive payment experiences to your business credit file and monitor your CreditBuilder account email address to know if it may have been compromised online.

3 Ways to Build Your Business Credit: Takeaways 

Getting starter business credit means your business has more chances to get funding, and at the best terms and rates. Building business credit in any manner starts with fundability. Set up your business credibly to satisfy lender requirements. Working with starter vendors is a great way to get going. Starter vendors will approve you for lines of credit with little fuss.

Our credit line hybrid is the most excellent of these three ways to build business credit. Your payments are reported, and you won’t have to provide extensive documentation. Using the D&B CreditBuilder is another fine way to build your first business credit. One massive advantage to CreditBuilder is getting a D-U-N-S faster than other businesses. 

But no matter which method(s) you choose, let’s take the next step together.

The post 3 Ways to Build Business Credit appeared first on Credit Suite.

3 Ways to Build Business Credit

What are the Ways to Business Credit? 

Business credit is credit you get in the name of a business. It does not attach to the business owner’s SSN. It is not dependent on the entrepreneur’s ability to pay debts. But it does depend on whether the business can pay its bills. Better business credit means your business can get more funding when it needs it, at better rates and terms than if you don’t work to build your business credit. Here are 3 ways to build business credit.

Business Credit is Not Automatic

You have to actively work to build it. Did you know over 9 out of every 10 vendors do not report to the business credit reporting agencies, Dun & Bradstreet, Experian, and Equifax? Therefore, except for requesting a trade reference, those nonreporting vendors don’t help you build business credit. So, what do you do? The following actions will help you no matter which method you use to build your company’s business credit.

Check Out Ways to Build Business Credit

Improving business credit scores means paying your bills on time. It also means paying with credit rather than cash when you can. This increases the number of accounts and purchases on your reports. And use the credit you already have regularly, so those accounts are not eventually closed due to inactivity.

A business starts building a brand-new credit profile much the same as a consumer does. Both start with no credit profile. The business gets approval for new credit reporting to the business credit reporting agencies. The business uses the credit and pays the bill timely. This establishes a positive business credit profile. As the business continues using credit and pays bills timely it will qualify for more credit.

Check out our best webinar with its trustworthy list of seven vendors to help you build business credit.

The First of 3 Ways to Build Business Credit: Vendor Accounts

One of the three ways to build business credit is with starter vendor accounts. These are companies which will approve your business with little fuss. A vendor line of credit is when a company (vendor) extends a line of credit to your business on Net 15, 30, 60 or 90 day terms. Hence you can buy their products or services up to a maximum dollar amount. And you have 15, 30, 60 or 90 days to pay the bill in full.

Since vendor accounts generally don’t ultimately come from a bank, like major credit cards (Visa, etc.) do, you can try to apply without using your Social Security number. Always apply first without using your SSN. Some vendors will request it and some will even tell you on the phone they must have it. But try to submit first without it.

Starter Vendors and D&B

When your first Net 30 account reports your tradeline to Dun & Bradstreet, the D-U-N-S system will automatically activate your file if it isn’t active already. This is also true for Experian and Equifax. Applying without your SSN means the vendor won’t pull your personal credit. As a result, you will be building business credit and not personal credit!

You need at least 3 vendor accounts reporting to move on. It can take a billing cycle to get your payment to show up in D&B’s system. Some vendors may want you to prepay or may have a minimal order requirement before they reporting to a business CRA. They may have minimal FICO score requirements as well. But you can often get around a minimum FICO requirement by working with a guarantor with good personal credit.

One of the Ways to Build Business Credit is to Go Beyond Starter Vendor Accounts

As you continue to prove yourself and your business, it becomes possible to qualify for revolving store credit. You can also qualify for fleet credit to buy fuel or repair and maintain vehicles. And you can even qualify for more universal cash credit from Visa and MasterCard and the like. So don’t stop with starter vendor accounts!

Check out our best webinar with its trustworthy list of seven vendors to help you build business credit.

The Second of 3 Ways to Build Business Credit: Our Credit Line Hybrid

You can get a line of credit for up to $150,000. This is no doc financing. Pay 0% for up to 18 months. It helps build business credit because your payments are reported. You must have a 680 or better FICO score. For more information, surf on over to my.creditsuite.com/qualifier-form.

This program works to help clients get funding based strictly on personal credit quality. Our lenders will not ask for financials, bank statements, business plans, resumes, or any of the other burdensome document requests which most conventional lenders demand.

Our lenders will review your credit report to ensure there are no derogatory items on it. To get approval, you shouldn’t have any open collections, late payments, tax liens, judgments, or the like on your report.

To qualify you should also have fewer than 5 inquiries on your credit report, within the last 6 months. You should have established credit. This includes open revolving accounts now reported on your credit report, with balances below 40% of your limits.

The Third of 3 Ways to Build Business Credit: Using the D&B CreditBuilder

Dun & Bradstreet has their own credit builder. It can help you get better business credit, but only with D&B. Dun & Bradstreet is huge, so concentrating just on them could be an effective strategy.

D&B offers advice for building business credit. A lot of it should be familiar. Their seven steps are to establish your business as a separate entity, register for a D-U-N-S number, get an EIN from the IRS, open a bank account for your business, make on-time payments, ask vendors to supply trade references to Dun & Bradstreet, and monitor your business credit scores and ratings.

Check out our best webinar with its trustworthy list of seven vendors to help you build business credit.

D&B’s CreditBuilder Plus

CreditBuilder Plus is essentially a monitoring service exclusive to Dun & Bradstreet. One major advantage is getting a D-U-N-S number faster than most businesses do. You can use it to get alerts when others request your business credit report. And you can get a D-U-N-S Number and business credit file in 5 business days or less. 

Plus you can get unlimited access to your D&B scores and ratings. And you can add 12 positive payment experiences to your business credit file and monitor your CreditBuilder account email address to know if it may have been compromised online.

3 Ways to Build Your Business Credit: Takeaways 

Getting starter business credit means your business has more chances to get funding, and at the best terms and rates. Building business credit in any manner starts with fundability. Set up your business credibly to satisfy lender requirements. Working with starter vendors is a great way to get going. Starter vendors will approve you for lines of credit with little fuss.

Our credit line hybrid is the most excellent of these three ways to build business credit. Your payments are reported, and you won’t have to provide extensive documentation. Using the D&B CreditBuilder is another fine way to build your first business credit. One massive advantage to CreditBuilder is getting a D-U-N-S faster than other businesses. 

But no matter which method(s) you choose, let’s take the next step together.

The post 3 Ways to Build Business Credit appeared first on Credit Suite.

The post 3 Ways to Build Business Credit appeared first on Business Marketplace Product Reviews.

How to Build a Chrome Extension

Have you ever been stuck doing a repetitive task and wish you could automate your process?

Are you tired of spending time searching for an appropriate extension, only to be met with an empty search result page?

Luckily, if you’re a Chrome user, you can create a Chrome extension in just eight simple steps.

How do we know? We created our own Ubersuggest Google Chrome Extension to streamline our keyword research systems.

In this post, we’ll show you how to make a Chrome extension to help you innovate your tasks and get back to productive work.

What is a Chrome Extension?

Google Chrome extensions are programs you can install in your Chrome browser to change its functionality.

Chrome extensions can help you automate certain functions in your browser, modify existing behaviors, and improve your software’s convenience. There are even Chrome extensions that can improve your SEO.

Chrome extensions are built with HTML, JavaScript, and CSS scripts and are essentially small websites uploaded to the Chrome store.

The only difference between a Chrome extension and a regular website is that Chrome extensions contain a manifest file, which gives them a specific function to execute.

Another way to think about Chrome extensions is that they are a piece of code that changes your browser experience.

For example, the Grammarly Chrome extension allows you to edit and modify your copy as you write. The LastPass extension will enable you to keep your password manager within your browser.

Here are 13 of our favorite Google Chrome extensions for you to consider.

What Can Chrome Extensions Do?

A custom-built extension can perform a single task. This task needs to be narrowly defined and easy to understand for it to work properly.

You can include more than one component or functionality, as long as everything directs the extension towards a singular goal.

Chrome extensions work by using either page actions or browser actions.

A page action is an action that is specific to certain pages.

A browser action is relevant no matter where you are in the browser.

As well, your user interfaces need to be user-friendly and straightforward. These can range from a single icon, think of the Gmail icon, or you can override an entire page for your interface.

Your final deliverable will be a zipped .crx package that users will download and install.

Why Should I Create a Chrome Extension?

Google Chrome is the most widely used browsing software in the world. According to W3Counter, Chrome has 65.3 percent of the total market share.

You should also create a Chrome extension if you are looking to add a simple action to your browser experience.

The benefit of Chrome extensions versus regular applications is they are often easier to build and maintain. Because Chrome extensions are built around a singular function, they take less time and skills to create.

Building a Chrome extension often takes far less time than building an entirely new webpage.

If you want a simple and effective way to modify your browser, then building a Chrome extension is the way to go.

Chrome extensions can also improve your web traffic, see more in the video below.

What Makes a Chrome Extension Successful?

A successful Google Chrome extension will simplify a task or functionality and improve your productivity.

Let’s imagine you are an e-commerce web builder and you’re researching competitor shops. If you install the Koala Inspector extension, you’ll be able to see if Shopify built any website you land on. You can also see what theme was used, if any new updates have been made, and view product statistics.

Another Chrome extension, the News Feed Eradicator for Facebook, can help improve your productivity by blocking your news feed so you can focus on your tasks. It is a simple but effective function that can help you improve your daily workflow.

Both of these extensions execute a simple functionality that improves user experience. When building a Chrome extension, keep simplicity in mind. That’s the secret to a successful extension.

Your Step-by-Step Guide to Creating a Chrome Extension

Now it’s time to build your Chrome extension.

It’s important to note that you need to do this on Google Chrome. This might seem obvious, but not everyone uses Chrome as their default browser.

If you aren’t a regular Chrome user, be sure to install it before you begin these steps.

Also, be sure to check your work frequently as you move through this process. It’s much easier to fix coding errors in the moment than after you finish.

Build a Chrome Extension Step 1: Determine What Your Extension Needs

The first step in building your Chrome extension is to decide on a functionality.

What will it do? What will it look like?

If you want to create an extension for your Google AdWords campaigns, this is the time to decide on how it will work.

An icon is required for all Chrome extensions to be uploaded to the Google Chrome store. Be sure to create or outsource an icon before you begin.

Once you know what your Chrome extension will do, and what you want it to look like, you can start building it out.

Below, we’re going to show you how to build an extension that will let you change the background color of your current page.

Build a Chrome Extension Step 2: Create a Directory for Your Extension

To begin building your Chrome extension, you’ll need to create a new directory to house all of your extension’s files.

This is important because, for Chrome to load your plugin, it needs to be pointed towards a folder containing your extension files.

You can add all of the files you will need for your extension into this directory.

Build a Chrome Extension Step 3: Make Your Extension’s Manifest File

The next step is to create your extension’s manifest file.

This file will tell Chrome how to load the extension properly.

Create a file called manifest.json and add it to your directory.

Then, add any code you might need to your manifest file.

For our purposes, the code will look like this:

{

“name”: “Getting Started Example”,

“description”: “Build an Extension!”,

“version”: “1.0”,

“manifest_version”: 3

}

Build a Chrome Extension Step 4: Load Your Extension into Chrome and Check for Errors

Now it’s time to test your extension to make sure Chrome will run it.

Follow these steps:

  1. Go to chrome://extensions in your Google Chrome browser
  2. Check the Developer mode checkbox in the top right-hand corner
  3. Click “Load Unpacked” to see a file-selection dialog
  4. Select your extension directory
example of google chrome extension loading screen

If your extension is valid, it should load immediately.

If it is invalid, you will see an error message at the top of your page. If this is the case, look for errors, correct them, and try loading your extension again.

The most common errors people make here are syntax errors. Double-check all of your commas and brackets and make sure they are formatted correctly.

Also, make sure the Enabled box next to your extension is checked so you can see it performing live.

Build a Chrome Extension Step 5: Develop Your Background Script

Next, you’ll need to add some background script to tell your extension what to do.

First, create a file named background.js inside your extensions directory.

Then, add your script.

For our color-changing extension, we’ll be using this script:

{

“name”: “Getting Started Example”,

“description”: “Build an Extension!”,

“version”: “1.0”,

“manifest_version”: 3,

“background”: {

“service_worker”: “background.js”

}

}

This file will alert Chrome that it needs to scan for additional instructions.

The extension we are building will also require a listening event for runtime.onInstalled within the background script.

Within the onInstall listener, the extension will set a value with the storage API. This allows multiple extension components to run and edit that value.

let color = ‘#3aa757’;

chrome.runtime.onInstalled.addListener(() => {

chrome.storage.sync.set({ color });

console.log(‘Default background color set to %cgreen’, `color: ${color}`);

});

Most API’s will need to be registered in the “permissions” field of your manifest. Like this:

{

“name”: “Getting Started Example”,

“description”: “Build an Extension!”,

“version”: “1.0”,

“manifest_version”: 3,

“background”: {

“service_worker”: “background.js”

},

“permissions”: [“storage”]

}

Next, go back to your extension management page and click Reload.

You should see a new field for Inspect views come up. There will also be an accompanying blue link that reads the background page.

example of chrome extension builder interface

Click the link and you will see the background script’s console log, which reads “Default background color set to green”.

Content scripts can also be added to run page-by-page scripts.

Content scripts should be added directly into your manifest file.

Build a Chrome Extension Step 6: Create Your User Interface

Your extension can have a range of user-interfaces, from pop-ups to tooltips, and more.

To begin designing your interface, you need to register a browser action in your manifest.

For our example, we’ll use a pop-up. The code looks like this:

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>

<head>

<link rel=”stylesheet” href=”button.css”>

</head>

<body>

<button id=”changeColor”></button>

</body>

</html>

You’ll need to declare this code within your manifest in order for it to work.

To do this, add an action to your manifest and set popup.html as the action’s default_popup.

Your script should look like this:

{

“name”: “Getting Started Example”,

“description”: “Build an Extension!”,

“version”: “1.0”,

“manifest_version”: 3,

“background”: {

“service_worker”: “background.js”

},

“permissions”: [“storage”],

“action”: {

“default_popup”: “popup.html”

}

}

This specific pop-up references a CSS script, so you’ll need to add another file to your directory. Name it appropriately, and add this:

button {

height: 30px;

width: 30px;

outline: none;

margin: 10px;

border: none;

border-radius: 2px;

}

button.current {

box-shadow: 0 0 0 2px white,

0 0 0 4px black;

}

For our example, you’ll also want to add color to your popup buttons. Later on, this color will be used for the background of your page as well.

Create and add a file named popup.js with the following code to the directory.

// Initialize button with user’s preferred color

let changeColor = document.getElementById(“changeColor”);

chrome.storage.sync.get(“color”, ({ color }) => {

changeColor.style.backgroundColor = color;

});

This will grab the button from popup.html and request the color value. Include a script tag to popup.js in popup.html like this:

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>

<head>

<link rel=”stylesheet” href=”button.css”>

</head>

<body>

<button id=”changeColor”></button>

<script src=”popup.js”></script>

</body>

</html>

From there, you can add badges to show the state of your extension. For example, a badge can tell a user if the extension is activated or not, on or off.

an icon showing on funtionality and a water drop below it

Toolbar icons fall under action in the default_icons field.

Place any desired images within your directory and then tell the extension how to use the images.

{

“name”: “Getting Started Example”,

“description”: “Build an Extension!”,

“version”: “1.0”,

“manifest_version”: 3,

“background”: {

“service_worker”: “background.js”

},

“permissions”: [“storage”],

“action”: {

“default_popup”: “popup.html”,

“default_icon”: {

“16”: “/images/get_started16.png”,

“32”: “/images/get_started32.png”,

“48”: “/images/get_started48.png”,

“128”: “/images/get_started128.png”

}

}

}

For images, 16×16 and 32×32 sizes are recommended. All icons should be square, or else they may end up distorted.

If you don’t supply an icon, Chrome will add a default one for you.

When designing your Chrome extension user interface, keep it simple and user-friendly.

Google says all extension interfaces should add to a browsing experience, not distract from it.

Before moving on, reload your extension and make sure everything looks right.

Build a Chrome Extension Step 7: Add in Some Logic

Logic furthers your user interface interaction.

Add logic scripts to whatever user-interface options you included.

Logic can tell your extension to perform certain actions, such as what to do when a button is clicked.

For example, if you used the popup.js script, you’ll want to include your logic at the end of it.

For our example, you can use this script:

// When the button is clicked, inject setPageBackgroundColor into current page

changeColor.addEventListener(“click”, async () => {

  let [tab] = await chrome.tabs.query({ active: true, currentWindow: true });

  chrome.scripting.executeScript({

    target: { tabId: tab.id },

    function: setPageBackgroundColor,

  });

});

// The body of this function will be executed as a content script inside the

// current page

function setPageBackgroundColor() {

  chrome.storage.sync.get(“color”, ({ color }) => {

    document.body.style.backgroundColor = color;

  });

}

function setPageBackgroundColor() {

chrome.storage.sync.get(“color”, ({ color }) => {

document.body.style.backgroundColor = color;

});

}

This code triggers a programmatically injected content script. This turns the background color of the page to the same color as your previously added button.

From here, your extension should be fully functional. Any new additions will be bells and whistles.

Build a Chrome Extension Step 8: Test Out Your Extension

Just like A/B testing in marketing, it’s important to continuously test your extension to ensure everything works.

Test it out yourself, or have someone else test it.

If you have another person test it, do it without giving them instructions to make sure it’s intuitive to use.

Make changes as needed, then test your extension again.

Even after you launch your extension, you can continuously optimize and improve it. That’s how we got the Ubersuggest Chrome extension 2.0.

Once you’re happy, it’s ready to use.

Can I Practice Making a Chrome Extension?

Once you upload your extension to the Chrome store it’s live and usable.

If you don’t want your Chrome extension to be publicly accessible, you can always make a GitHub repo that people can clone from.

This requires giving people access to your source code, so be sure to consider this before uploading anything onto GitHub.

You can also experiment with open source samples before diving into your extension.

Samples for Chrome Extensions are available on Google’s GitHub.

Conclusion

Creating a custom Google Chrome extension is a great way to improve your browser functionality and create optimal user experiences.

What’s more, your tool can drive traffic to your website, so modifying that experience can result in new leads for your business.

Remember, some of the most powerful Chrome extensions were built by people just like you!

It may be a learning curve to get your extension where you want it to be, but it’s worth it when you have an exciting new feature to show off to your friends—and prospective clients.

What kind of Chrome extensions have you built?

5 Resources to Build Your App Idea

Considering building an app? You’re in good company. 

The mobile app industry is expected to be worth more than $407 billion (yes, with a B) by 2026. 

Meanwhile, the average person has more than 80 apps on their phone. That represents a ton of opportunities for app builders. 

However, if you think creating an app is an easy way to get rich, you are setting yourself up for failure. Building an app requires research, hard work, and a willingness to dive in and learn. 

Luckily, there are tons of resources to get you started—including this guide. Below, I’ll walk you through how to build out your app idea and then share five resources to help you launch your app.

How to Build Out Your App Idea

Like any business, creating an app requires laying the groundwork before launch. Here’s a five-step guide for getting ready to launch your app, including how to do your research, ways to monetize your app, and what to include in your business plan. 

Build an App Step 1: Do Market Research

Before you dive into creating your app, you first need to get a lay of the land. Who is your target audience? What other apps offer similar features or functionality? How does your app stand apart?

Start by creating a buyer persona map, which will help you understand who your audience is and what they want. Use this information to create a detailed sales plan, decide what features to include, and choose where to market your app.

Then, perform a competitive analysis to understand your competitors. The information you gain from this will be critical as you build and grow your app. Focus on what current apps do well and what they don’t. The areas where they fail can present opportunities for you to improve and take over part of their market. 

For example, if your goal is to build an app that offers workout and diet recommendations, take the time to download similar apps and read their reviews. What features do people ask for, and what features do they dislike? Who is using these apps? How are they monetized? 

Be thorough—you’ll use this information in the next few steps. 

Build an App Step 2: Decide How to Monetize Your App

There are several ways to make money from an app. The right choice for your app likely depends on your industry, target audience, and the type of app you create. For example, games are often monetized by ads and in-app purchases, while dating apps generally charge a monthly subscription fee.

Consider each of the following monetization methods to decide which is right for your app:

  • Ads: Create a free app and earn money by selling ads in your app. Duolingo uses this model, though they also offer a paid plan. 
  • In-app purchase: Provide a free app and then allow users to purchase add-ons, like Pokemon Go does. 
  • Freemium: Give users access to a limited plan for free and then charge them to access all the features, like the meditation app Mindfulness does. 
  • One-time payment: Charge a one-time fee to access the app. Just keep in mind you won’t have a continuing income stream for updates, redesigns, and marketing. 
  • Monthly subscription: Charge a small fee every month for access to the app. This helps you maintain a steady stream of income, making it easier to pay salaries and invest in marketing. 

Many apps use multiple monetization methods. For example, you might offer a limited free plan and then charge a monthly subscription fee to access all features. You might even use ads to monetize the free plan and offer a paid plan that is ad-free. 

There are pros and cons to each monetization method. Some users might be annoyed by too many ads or hate paying for subscription services. See what other apps in your industry do, but don’t be afraid to break the mold by trying out a different method. 

Build an App Step 3: Create a Business Plan

Most people assume building an app is all about coding, but the real work actually starts long before you create your first line of code (or before you begin building it if you use an app builder).

After you get to know your audience and decide how to monetize your app, take the time to create a business plan. This plan should guide your first few years in business and keep you committed to your app’s core purpose. 

According to the Small Business Administration, your business plan should include: 

  • Executive summary: A brief outline of your company, what you will offer, and basic information about your leadership team, location, and plans for growth.
  • Company description: A detailed guide covering what problem your business will solve, who your app will serve, and what competitive advantages your app offers. 
  • Market analysis: A summary of your market research that covers what your app’s strengths are, trends you take advantage of, and how your app stacks up against others in the same industry. 
  • Structure and management: An explanation of who’s in charge of your business and how your company is structured. Are you creating a C corp or an LLC, or are you a sole proprietor? Include a list of key leaders, their CVs and resumes, and even an outline of the benefits each person brings to the table. 
  • Offering: A description of what your app does and how it benefits customers. Include plans for patent filings or copyright, if applicable. 
  • Market and sales plans: An outline of your marketing strategy and how it will adjust over time. Cover how you plan to attract and keep customers, the sales process, and where you’ll focus your marketing efforts. 
  • Financial projections: Information about your costs, where that money will come from, and prospective profits. Costs of creating an app may be low (especially using the app tools we’ll cover in the next section), but you’ll still need money for things like web hosting, paid ads, etc. Forecast sales for the first year, five years, and ten years, and make sure to explain how you reached those numbers and outline where funding will come from. 

Build an App Step 4: Create the App

Now that you’ve laid the groundwork, it’s time to actually create your app. This might feel a little overwhelming, but it doesn’t have to be. You have three main options for building your app. Let’s explore the pros and cons of each one. 

Code the App Yourself 

If you are technologically savvy, you may be able to code the app yourself. Make sure you have a deep understanding of coding or the patience to learn

Pros: 

  • cheap (it only costs your own time) 
  • full control over features, coding platforms, etc. 

Cons: 

  • requires a deep understanding of coding
  • time-consuming 

Hire an App Builder 

Hiring an app builder might be costly, but it could help you get the app to market faster than coding it yourself.

Pros: 

  • launch faster 
  • no need to learn coding languages 

Cons: 

  • can be expensive 
  • less control over features 

Use an App Building Tool 

Remember when building a website required expensive programs and in-depth coding skills? Now you can build a website with just a few clicks. App building tools offer the same functionality for apps. 

Pros: 

  • faster and easier than coding or hiring an app builder
  • likely cheaper than hiring someone to build your app 
  • get to market faster

Cons: 

  • limited by the app builder’s functionality 
  • have to pay to use most (though they are typically affordable) 

Build an App Step 5: Launch & Submit to App Stores

Once your app is built, you’ll need to test it before launch. Ask a few friends to download the app and tell you what you think. Consider using a mobile UX testing tool to see how users navigate your app and make adjustments before you launch. 

Then, you’ll need to submit your app to app stores, which is where users will download it. The most popular app stores are Apple’s App Store and Google Play. Follow this guide to submit your app to the App Store and this one to submit to Google Play

Don’t forget to optimize for app SEO! This will help you rank higher so people actually find your app. 

5 Resources to Help You Build Your App 

Creating an app is easier than ever, thanks in part to the variety of app tools that help you build and launch a mobile app. However, with so many options, it can be challenging to figure out which one to use.

Let’s review a few of the top app tools so you can find the right one for you.

iBuildApp

iBuildApp is a full-featured app builder that provides all the tools you need to build an app using its drag-and-drop functionality. Start with any one of their 1000+ templates, then drag and drop features to add video, images, text, and more. 

This tool is ideal for building apps for e-commerce stores, education, healthcare, business, media, retail, and financial services. Brands such as the U.S. Navy, Whole Foods, SEGA, and Emory University have used this tool.

Resources to Help You Build Your App - iBuildApp

Price: Starts at $59.40 per month for one app. 

Appy Pie AppMakr 

Want to build an app but don’t have any coding experience? Appy Pie helps you build an app in just three steps. Choose from over 100 features, including GPS, in-app shopping, offline capabilities, and push notifications. They also offer analytics so you can measure app performance. 

You can use it to create apps for dating sites, customer reward programs, chatbots, retail, restaurants, and more. They’ll even help you submit the app to app stores. 

Appy Pie is used by brands like The Home Depot, Southwest, and Nike. 

Resources to Help You Build Your App - Appy Pie AppMakr

Price: Options start at $18 per month for an ad-free experience, and they also offer a free trial. 

BuildFire

BuildFire is a full-featured app development tool that allows you to build an app with no coding. Use their templates and then customize your app with hundreds of features like push notifications, clocks, private portals, loyalty programs, checklists, forms, or media. 

They also offer a white-label feature, which allows you to build and sell apps to clients. 

Though pricier than other options, this app build tool offers a lot more tools and features, so it’s an ideal choice for building more detailed apps. 

Resources to Help You Build Your App - BuildFire

Price: Plans start at $159 per month, billed annually. 

Usability Geek

Creating an app is just the first step—you also need to test the user experience. Usability Geek provides tools, resources, and UX testing guides to help your app succeed. Explore their UX courses and blog posts about usability to learn the skills you need to help your app succeed. 

Offered courses cover a range of topics, including the Psychology of E-Commerce, How to Create a UX Portfolio, and Quantitative Research for UX. Some courses even offer certification. 

Resources to Help You Build Your App - Usability Geek

Price: Usability Geek offers free blogs about usability testing as well as paid training courses that start at $16 per month. 

GoodBarber

GoodBarber is an easy-to-use app build tool designed for both e-commerce and standard app building. Like many other app tools, it doesn’t require any coding knowledge. 

This tool is ideal for building apps for local delivery, retail, grocery, e-commerce, news, business, and community. Features include adding payment options, push notifications, user authentication, geofencing marketing, videos, maps, calendars, and forms. 

Resources to Help You Build Your App - GoodBarber

Price: Pricing starts at $25 per month for one app and includes SEO optimization, domain name, SSL security, 200 GB of storage, and unlimited pages. 

They also offer reseller plans, which start at $200 per month. 

Conclusion

With the help of app build tools, launching an app is easier than ever. With little to no coding knowledge, you can create, launch, and optimize your new app in just a few days. 

However, building a successful app is about more than just dragging and dropping features. To be successful, take the time to create a business and marketing plan, research your target audience, and make a plan for funding your venture.

Have you built an app before? What app build tools were most helpful to you?

The post 5 Resources to Build Your App Idea appeared first on Neil Patel.

How to Build a Sales Forecast Model

In an ideal world, sales teams and business leaders would have crystal balls to help them predict accurate sales forecasts. With these predictions, it would be easier to create budgets, set goals, know when you’ll need to hire more people, and so much more. Unfortunately, crystal balls belong in the movies, and predicting anything in …

The post How to Build a Sales Forecast Model first appeared on Online Web Store Site.

How to Build a Sales Forecast Model

In an ideal world, sales teams and business leaders would have crystal balls to help them predict accurate sales forecasts.

With these predictions, it would be easier to create budgets, set goals, know when you’ll need to hire more people, and so much more.

Unfortunately, crystal balls belong in the movies, and predicting anything in business, especially revenue, can be challenging.

Then what’s the best way to go about creating sales forecasts for your business?

Firstly, you need to understand what forecasting is.

In a nutshell, a sales forecast is your predictions of what you will sell weekly, monthly, quarterly, or annually.

An important element for forecasting is to be more realistic than hopeful. Too often, sales teams will be overly optimistic when setting goals.

This, unfortunately, leads to disappointment when you’re halfway through the year and your team starts realizing that you’re still far from reaching your goals.

I want better for you. I want you to set goals that you can reach. Goals that will help keep you and your team motivated.

Here’s my detailed breakdown of how to predict your business’s future revenue.

Pros and Cons of Doing Your Own Sales Forecasting to Predict Revenue

Some business leaders and sales teams decide to create their own forecasts. Is this a good idea?

Well, let’s have a look at some of the advantages and disadvantages of this.

Pro 1: You’ll Gain Valuable Insight

Since forecasting involves looking into historical and real-time data, you are forced to gain insight into your business’s health and overall growth. This information can help you set better future goals for your business.

Pro 2: You Can Decrease Costs

If you have a small business or startup, you’re likely trying to cut costs any way you can. Doing some essential tasks on your own, like revenue predictions, will help you save costs that you can channel into other areas of your business.

Pro 3: You’ll Know What to Focus On

There are many moving parts to a growing business. Understanding each component helps you achieve your overall business goals.

When you do your own sales forecasts, you’ll know what you need to focus more on to help your business continue growing.

For instance, if you predict that your sales will increase by 5 percent in the next three months, you can then allocate the necessary resources to help your sales team achieve this goal.

Con 1: Sales Forecasting Takes Time

As highlighted above, you’ll need to create revenue predictions that may be weekly, monthly, quarterly, or annually.

To create these forecasts and make an informed decision, you’ll have to look into historical data. This can be time-consuming to do on your own.

Con 2: Lack of Input From Outside the Company

Sometimes, it’s challenging to see the whole picture when you’re in the frame. Employing a team of planners from outside the organization can help you get someone else’s informed decision on your company. This can give you valuable insight into the health of your company.

If you’re the business owner, it’s challenging to be subjective and remove all emotions when creating forecasts. Your business means a lot to you.

You’re working hard to ensure that it’s a success. If you’re not careful, your projections have the potential of being more optimistic than realistic. An outsider will be more objective and base each decision on real data.

If you’ve weighed up your pros and cons and feel that you would like to create your own forecasts, it’s now time to understand how these can benefit you.

Why Use Sales Forecasts?

Before we get to how we first need to understand why we need sales forecasts in the first place. What value do they add to your business?

When you build a solid sales forecast, you can foresee potential issues and work on fixing them.

For instance, if you’re halfway through the year and see that your sales are trending 20 percent below quota, you can quickly assess the situation to figure out what is preventing you from achieving your goals.

Figuring out potential problems right away, instead of waiting until the end of the year or the quarter, can make a huge difference in any business.

Having you and your sales team be aware of the sales forecast can work as a great motivation tool. You can have weekly or monthly sales updates to let the team know how far you are from reaching your goals.

An important thing to remember when building sales forecasts is that they won’t be perfect. By the end of the quarter or financial year, you might be below your goals, or you might have surpassed them.

Whatever the case may be, creating forecasts is still a necessary part of your business plan as they help you and your team stay on the same page and work toward common goals.

Instructions for Creating a Sales Forecast to Predict Revenue

Now that you understand the value of building a solid sales forecast, let’s get into how to get it done.

1. Pick or Create a Sales Forecast Template

What specific information do you want to get out of your sales forecast? This is an important question as the answer will help you decide on the template that makes the most sense for you and your business.

You may want to look at information like:

  • How much revenue you currently earn in a quarter, and how much you predict to make in the next quarter.
  • Are you introducing a new product? How much revenue should you expect to generate from the product, considering past and current market trends?

You may be able to find a template for what you’re looking for, or you can create a unique template that includes all the metrics you’re interested in tracking and makes the most sense for your business.

2. Select the Products Included in Your Sales Forecast

The products you include in your sales forecast will depend on what you’re specifically forecasting. For instance, if you decide to create a quarterly sales forecast, you may include all your sales for that period.

On the other hand, if you want to forecast sales for specific verticals or products, you’ll probably only have those products.

It’s essential to be as specific as possible and also be clear on how you would like to incorporate the products you’ve selected for consideration in your forecast.

For instance, if you’ll be forecasting sales across a quarter, you need to decide how to set your actual forecast.

You can include a line prediction for each product you sell, and you can include another line item for how much you expect to sell in your different product lines or categories.

If you would like to create a medium- to long-term forecast (e.g., over a 12-month period), you can develop monthly forecasts leading up to that period.

These forecasts can include the price per unit and units sold for each product.

Instructions for Creating Sales Forecast - Select the Products Included in Your Sales Forecast

3. Calculate Predicted Revenue

Now’s the fun part: calculating your predicted revenue. There are multiple ways you can predict future revenue.

You Can Use Historical Data

If you’ve been selling your products or services for a while, looking into your historical data to give you an idea of a realistic revenue you can expect to achieve is essential.

While considering historical data can help, it’s not always an accurate predictor of future sales. For instance, you might have been a newcomer in the past, but now you may be well-established in your industry.

The sales you received in your first year won’t match the sales you’ll receive in this coming year.

While this is true, it’s always important to consider historical data as this is your foundation. You can use this information as a baseline for your sales goals.

You Can Consider the Season

Some products are seasonal, while others sell at a consistent rate all year long. There are also certain times of the year (e.g., Black Friday, Cyber Monday, and Christmas season) where consumers generally spend a lot of money. These factors will affect your revenue during these periods.

You Can Consider the Market

No matter how amazing your product or service is, sometimes there’s a ceiling regarding how much you can realistically sell at certain times. For instance, if you sell gadgets, what used to be “cool” five years ago may not be today.

The tech space is constantly evolving, and if your products or services don’t get updated to meet consumer demands, your revenue might tend toward a downward trend.

After considering all these factors, you can look at the best-case scenario and then predict sales based on that number.

Again, it’s essential to be realistic here. If you own a pizza place and your only competitor from across the street sells an average of 50 pizzas per day, predicting to sell 1,000 pizzas per day is more hopeful than realistic.

Many professionals use scenario analysis to help them understand what the best- and worst-case scenarios may be for their predicted revenue.

4. Create a Tracking System

Creating a tracking system is one of the most crucial elements to successfully forecasting.

If, for instance, you find that you’ve made predictions that are way off when you’re in the middle of the sales cycle, referring to your tracking system will help you immediately see this. You can then quickly update or adjust your sales forecast.

The tracking system you use doesn’t need to be complicated. For example, you can create an Excel spreadsheet and even create graphs, like this one from SmartSheet, to help you see whether your sales are reaching, below, or surpassing your predicted revenue.

Instructions for Creating Sales Forecast to Predict Revenue - Create a Tracking System

5. Ensure Your Team Is Aligned

The value of having a team that’s working toward the same goals can’t be overstated. That’s why it’s essential to ensure that every team member is aware of the sales forecasts and, more importantly, that they agree with them.

Why?

While you may be the leader, you can’t achieve your predicted sales on your own. You need everyone to work toward reaching those goals and also believe in them.

Sharing with your team can also help you get their valuable opinions on the predictions you made.

Maybe you missed an important factor that might affect sales for that period. Or maybe there’s a new trend in the market that your sales team recently discovered. Their input is essential before the stakeholders sign off on the sales forecasts.

6. Use Tools to Make Your Sales Forecast Process Easier

We’re well into the digital age, and there are various tools that can help make your life a little easier.

For instance, you can use Google Sheets to create your forecasts in a neat spreadsheet. Furthermore, you will be able to access them from any device with internet access.

To keep in touch with your team and share regular updates on forecasts, you can use online collaboration tools, such as Asana, Trello, or Slack.

Instructions for Creating Sales Forecast to Predict Revenue - Use Tools to Make Your Sales Forecast Process Easier

All these tools allow you to share links and documents with your team members so that they can access valuable information at any time.

When choosing tools, look for options that are easy for you and your team to use and integrate. It’s also important to pay close attention to the privacy policies of the organizations. In addition, consider tools with multiple features to make organization a little easier.

Conclusion

Sales forecasting is an essential part of your business, but sometimes generic templates aren’t relevant. Use the above tips to create an informed sales forecast that will work for your needs.

Have you created a sales forecast model before? What interesting tips can you share?

The post How to Build a Sales Forecast Model appeared first on Neil Patel.

How To Build a WordPress Website

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WordPress has officially passed the 39% mark and powers over one-third of the entire web. 

It’s like the Oprah Winfrey of the web hosting world—reliable, has a loyal user base, an excellent reputation, and is super popular worldwide. Therefore, it makes perfect sense to build a website on WordPress.

Creating a website may seem scary if you aren’t a “techie“ type of person, but trust me when I tell you that times have changed. It’s now faster, cheaper, and easier than ever.

In this guide, I’ll tell you how to build a WordPress site in under 60 minutes. 

Ready?

Your Two-Minute Cheat Sheet

Don’t have enough time to go through the whole article? Here’s your quick cheat sheet.

Disclaimer: This is just the gist of the whole shebang. So, don’t go looking for too many details here. Those are further below.

While you have several web hosting provider options available, I recommend starting your WordPress website journey with Bluehost. It’s super dependable, offers fast loading times, and is good for your budget.

The first step is to set up your account with Bluehost. The whole thing is pretty simple and only involves choosing a subscription plan, registering your domain name, and finalizing the deal. That’s it!

Next, you have to install WordPress (Bluehost does it for you) and familiarize yourself with its UI. Then you’ll have to pick a theme for your website that suits your brand best and also makes things functional. My favorite is ThemeForest, but you can also stick to WordPress’s official directory. 

Make sure you set your permalink structure to make your links more readable and optimized for the SERPs. This is super important, so please don’t skip it. You can also install plugins to extend your website’s abilities, but it’s strictly optional.

Finally, all that’s left to do is create fantastic content that makes visitors flock to your website.

Voila! You now have a WordPress website that looks beautiful, has amazing content, and is ready to handle the traffic.

Let’s now see how the whole thing works in more detail.

Step 1: Choose a Domain Name

Your domain name is your identity on the internet. It’s how your audience will find you and identify your brand. Precisely why you should choose something that reflects your brand and is easier for people to type into their browser and find you.

You have complete freedom to choose your domain name, though. You can choose any name you want—provided it is available and not registered by other companies. 

Here are a few tips for selecting a great domain name for your website:

  • Make it brandable and unique-sounding
  • Make sure it’s memorable
  • Keep it short 
  • Keep it easy to spell, pronounce, and type 
  • Include niche-related words. For instance, if you plan on selling pizza, it would make sense to add pizza somewhere in the domain.

Think about it: Doesn’t www.pizzahut.com sound better than pizzasellingplace.com? Exactly.

You can use Domain Wheel, a free website name generator, to develop more ideas if you’re looking for some inspiration. Simply put in a keyword related to your niche, and the tool will give you tons of suggestions to inspire you.

Now that you have a prospective domain name, you have to check for its availability. Considering there are about 1.8 million websites online, staying original can be a little challenging, but it’s definitely worth the effort.

Since we all love free things, you can register your domain free of cost when subscribing to a web hosting service.

Speaking of domain registration…

Step 2: Choose a Web Hosting Provider and Register a Domain Name

There are hundreds of companies that sell web hosting services and tons of companies that allow you to register a new domain name. But wouldn’t it be more convenient to choose a company that offers you both services?

Case in point: Bluehost.

This web hosting provider is reliable, beginner-friendly, cheap, AND gives you a domain name for free—take it from someone who has created many websites for his clients in his career. 

Let’s also not forget that Bluehost is one of the few companies recommended on the official WordPress.org web page.

Sold on Bluehost? Great!

Here’s how to proceed next:

Visit Bluehost’s Website

Go to Bluehost in your web browser.

Select Your Hosting Plan

You’ll see three hosting plan options displayed on your screen:

  • Basic – Starting at $2.95 per month
  • Plus – Starting at $4.95 per month
  • Choice Plus – Starting at $5.45 per month

As you’re just launching your website, you can choose the cheapest plan—Basic—and get yourself a piece of the internet. Remember, you’ll get the $2.95 price tag only if you choose the three-year subscription plan.

Register Your Domain

Once you select your subscription plan, Bluehost will ask you to set up and register your domain.

You will see two options here:

  • Create a new domain
  • Use a domain you own

Select the Create a new domain option and enter your chosen name from Step 1. I’ll also recommend selecting a .com extension to add a more professional touch to your website.

Fill In Your Personal Information and Account Details

Next, you have to provide your personal data to set up your account.

When you scroll down, you’ll see the Package Extras section. Take care to check only those fields that you think are worthwhile for your website. 

For me, selecting Domain Privacy + Protection is a must as it conceals personal information like name, email, and phone number from appearing in public databases. After all, spending a few extra cents is nothing when it comes to security.

Once you’re done, click on Submit to finalize your purchase.

Step 3: Get Bluehost to Install WordPress for You

At this point, you have a hosting service provider and a domain name. Congratulations!

The only thing missing is WordPress.

Sure, you can install WordPress manually. But why should you do it if you can get Bluehost to do it for you—for free?

After completing the signup process, check your inbox for an email from Bluehost. It‘ll contain details showing you how to log in to your customer profile and start work on your site. 

Once you log in, Bluehost will show you an easy-to-use wizard that will guide you through the process of installing WordPress on your hosting set up.

Alternative Option:

You can also install WordPress by going to the My Sites section. Click on the Create Site button, and the installation will begin automatically. Enter your new site’s name and the username/password, and your WordPress website will be ready to go.

Step 4: Choose a Theme or Design for Your Website

One of the biggest USPs of WordPress is it supports themes. 

Themes are interchangeable designs that allow you to change how your WordPress website looks at the touch of a button. For example, this is what your website will look like by default:

You can change your website’s appearance by choosing another popular free theme (I chose Hestia). It’ll now look like this:

See why theme compatibility is WordPress’s biggest USP?

Choose a Theme You Like

There are hundreds—if not thousands—of WordPress themes out there. 

You can start by looking at the official directory at WordPress.org. But other than that, there are several other theme stores and marketplaces, such as ThemeForest. These are third-party sites that offer free and premium themes to alter the website’s presentation without changing the contents.

You can go through all the different sites and select a theme that you like best.

Install Your Chosen Theme

If you select a theme from the official directory at WordPress.org, all you have to do is hit Install right away. Here’s how to go about it:

Go to Appearance, followed by Themes, and then click on Add New. Enter the name of the theme you want to install in the search bar, and then click on the Install button under your desired theme.

After the installation, click on Activate to enable the thing on your website.

If you want to use a theme bought from a trusted third-party, the steps will differ slightly. 

Here’s how you can install a premium theme on your site:

  1. Start by downloading the .zip file of the new theme. 
  2. Log in to your WordPress dashboard, and go to Appearance, and then Themes.
  3. Click on the Add New option. You’ll then be directed to the WordPress theme dashboard. 
  4. Select the blue button at the top of the screen that says Upload Theme. Choose the .zip file from your computer after the prompt.

You’ll see a link to activate your team after a success message. That’s it!

While some themes are free, premium themes vary in price. There are options starting at $10 and ones going all the way up to $200. You can choose an option that fits your budget and preferences best.

Step 5: Install Plugins (Optional)

You can consider installing plugins to boost the functionality of your website. Think of them as applications for your mobile phone.

You can refer to our best WordPress plugins guide to zero down options, but you have free reign to choose the ones that appeal to you most. From optimization to website traffic analysis to security, you’ll find tons of options for every category.

That said, don’t go overboard when installing plugins. It ends up slowing down your website, which, in turn, might result in traffic loss. 

As they say, there is too much of a good thing.

Step 6: Configure Important Site Settings

Setting up permalinks is very, very important! Precisely why you should do this immediately after starting your WordPress website.

Permalink structure decides how your website links look. Think of it as a representation of your site structure. For NeilPatel.com, it looks something like this:

A good permalink structure tells your visitor exactly where they are on your website (in our example, they are in our blog section), while a bad structure does the opposite. Getting the permalink structure right is also crucial for boosting your SEO ranking.

There are many ways to do it wrong, which is why I’ve compiled a three-step guide to help you get it right:

  1. In your WordPress dashboard, click on Settings from the side menu and go to Permalinks.
  2. Under the Common Settings field, click on Custom Structure
  3. It makes zero sense to go for Numeric as it’ll only confuse your visitor. Plus, it doesn’t serve much for SEO purposes.
  4. Enter the tag string “/blog/%postname%/

Once you’re done, click on Save to save the changes.

Step 7: Set up Important Webpages and Promote Your Site

With your website ready, you can now focus on creating high-quality content that helps you boost your traffic and conversions. Start by creating essential webpages like About, Contact Form, Privacy Policy, Portfolio, and Store (if applicable).

Want more information and a step-by-step walkthrough? Head over to my guides on how to start a blog and how to make money from blogging.

I really cannot emphasize enough the importance of having optimized content on your website that is relevant to your niche. So make sure you do thorough research to get all the nitty-gritty right.

Conclusion 

That was all you needed to build a WordPress website. 

At the end of it all, you’ll have a domain name, a web hosting provider, and an up and running website. Keep experimenting in your niche, and you’ll soon establish a loyal fan base that values your opinion or love your products/service.

Have you launched your website yet? Who is your all-time favorite web hosting provider, if yes?

The post How To Build a WordPress Website appeared first on Neil Patel.